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Marianne Blackwell, JD
Executive Director of Estate and Gift Planning
University of the Pacific
3601 Pacific Avenue
Stockton, CA 95211
Tel 209.946.2501
Fax 209.946.2664
mblackwell@pacific.edu
Linda P. Frank, Ph.D.
Major Gifts Officer
Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry
155 Fifth Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
Tel 415.749.3303
Fax 415.929.6455
lfrank@pacific.edu
Nancy DeGuire, PharmD
Assistant Dean, External Relations
Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
3601 Pacific Avenue
Stockton, CA 95211
Tel 209.946.2752
ndeguire@pacific.edu
Charlene Mattison
Assistant Dean, Advancement
Pacific McGeorge School of Law
3200 Fifth Ave.
Sacramento, CA 95817
Tel 916.739.7229
cmattison@pacific.edu

Office of Estate and Gift Planning

Throughout our long history, Pacific students have benefited from the thoughtful planning of supporters like you. Your support enables us to:

  • Make a Pacific education possible for passionate, ambitious and intellectual students who would otherwise lack the funding to do so.
  • Create ideal teaching and learning environments.
  • Recruit top-quality, student-centered professors.
  • Fund groundbreaking faculty research to the benefit of all.

Planned gifts play a transformational role in helping our students reach their potential. Our experienced staff is happy to help you leave a lasting impact at Pacific that prepares tomorrow's students become leaders in their careers and communities.

I want to plan a gift based on my...

Amount
Age
Assets

Retirement Plan Assets

Most popular ways to give this asset:

Life Insurance

Most popular ways to give this asset:

Not sure how to get started?

Answer a few simple questions and we'll point you down the right path.

Cash

You may always use cash as part of your charitable giving strategy. Oftentimes charitable remainder trusts are funded with cash in addition to stock or real estate.

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Appreciated Securities

Highly appreciated assets that generate low current income are an ideal funding option.

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Closely Held Stock

You may be able to convert stock that pays no dividends into an income-producing asset and receive tax benefits in return.

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Real Estate

When appreciated real estate is used to fund a remainder trust, no capital gains tax is due upon the sale of the property.

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Retirement Plan Assets

If you name a charitable remainder trust as a beneficiary of retirement plan assets, there will be no immediate income tax due on the plan proceeds paid to the trust because the trust is tax-exempt.

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Tangible Personal Property

You may be able contribute tangible personal property to a charitable remainder trust and turn non-income-producing property into a stream of income for you or your family.

More about Tangible Personal Property
Cash

You may always use cash to fund a lead trust. Oftentimes, lead trusts are funded with cash in addition to stock or real estate.

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Appreciated Securities

A charitable lead trust may be funded using a single appreciated security or a diversified stock and bond portfolio with high potential for growth over time.

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Closely Held Stock

One of the most common assets used to fund a lead trust is closely held stock in a family business that has the potential to grow over the years.

More about Closely Held Stock
Real Estate

Income-producing real estate is a perfect asset to fund a lead trust.

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Cash

A gift of cash in the form of a check is the easiest way to memorialize your loved one and support our work.

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Appreciated Securities

The most tax-efficient way to fund a memorial is with appreciated assets you have held for more than a year.

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Tangible Personal Property

If you have a friend or family member whose life has been touched by Pacific, consider making a gift of tangible personal property to us in his or her name.

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Real Estate

A gift of real estate may be a perfect way to honor your loved one. When you make a gift of real estate you have owned longer than a year, you obtain a federal income tax charitable deduction equal to the property's full fair market value.

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Cash

A gift of cash in the form of a check is the easiest way to create a lasting legacy through our endowment.

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Appreciated Securities

The most tax-efficient way to fund an endowed gift is with appreciated assets you have held for more than a year.

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Tangible Personal Property

You may be able to use non-income-producing property such as stamp and coin collections or works of art in exchange for a federal income tax charitable deduction.

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Real Estate

Your gift of appreciated real estate will qualify for a federal income tax charitable deduction for the fair market value of the property and eliminate long-term capital gains tax.

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Cash

When you establish a donor advised fund with cash, you will receive an immediate federal income tax charitable deduction for the year the gift was created.

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Appreciated Securities

Eliminate capital gains tax by donating appreciated assets you have held for more than a year on the transfer.

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Retirement Plan Assets

You may make your donor advised fund a beneficiary of your retirement plan assets. You could then designate your loved ones as the donor advisors, which would allow them to make recommendations on what charitable organizations to support through the fund.

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Tangible Personal Property

You may be able to use non-income-producing property such as stamp and coin collections or works of art in exchange for a federal income tax charitable deduction.

More about Tangible Personal Property
Real Estate

Your gift of appreciated real estate will qualify for a federal income tax charitable deduction for the fair market value of the property and eliminate long-term capital gains tax.

More about Real Estate
Cash

Cash—usually in the form of a check—is one of the most common ways to fund a charitable gift annuity.

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Appreciated Securities

By funding a charitable gift annuity with appreciated securities you've owned more than a year, you receive the additional benefit of eliminating part of the capital gains tax on the transfer.

More about Appreciated Securities
Closely Held Stock

Use this asset, which is not easily converted to cash, to create a charitable gift annuity and receive tax benefits.

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Real Estate

Unencumbered real estate such as a personal residence, vacation home, farm or commercial property works best to fund a deferred charitable gift annuity.

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Tangible Personal Property

Use non-income producing assets such as stamp and coin collections or works of art in exchange for fixed payments for life.

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A charitable bequest is one or two sentences in your will or living trust that leave to University of the Pacific a specific item, an amount of money, a gift contingent upon certain events or a percentage of your estate.

an individual or organization designated to receive benefits or funds under a will or other contract, such as an insurance policy, trust or retirement plan

"I, [name], of [city, state ZIP], give, devise and bequeath to #OrgName [written amount or percentage of the estate or description of property] for its unrestricted use and purpose.”

able to be changed or cancelled

A revocable living trust is set up during your lifetime and can be revoked at any time before death. They allow assets held in the trust to pass directly to beneficiaries without probate court proceedings and can also reduce federal estate taxes.

cannot be changed or cancelled

tax on gifts generally paid by the person making the gift rather than the recipient

the original value of an asset, such as stock, before its appreciation or depreciation

the growth in value of an asset like stock or real estate since the original purchase

the price a willing buyer and willing seller can agree on

The person receiving the gift annuity payments.

the part of an estate left after debts, taxes and specific bequests have been paid

a written and properly witnessed legal change to a will

the person named in a will to manage the estate, collect the property, pay any debt, and distribute property according to the will

A donor-advised fund is an account that you set up but which is managed by a nonprofit organization. You contribute to the account, which grows tax-free. You can recommend how much money (and how often) you want to distribute money from that fund to Pacific or other charities. You cannot direct the gifts.

An endowed gift can create a new endowment or add to an existing endowment. The principal of the endowment is invested and a portion of the principal’s earnings are used each year to support our mission.

Tax on the growth in value of an asset—such as real estate or stock—since its original purchase.

Securities, real estate, or any other property having a fair market value greater than its original purchase price.

Real estate can be a personal residence, vacation home, timeshare property, farm, commercial property or undeveloped land.

A charitable remainder trust provides you or other named individuals income each year for life or a period not exceeding 20 years from assets you give to the trust you create.

You give assets to a trust that pays our organization set payments for a number of years, which you choose. The longer the length of time, the better the gift tax savings to you. When the term is up, the remaining trust assets go to you, your family or other beneficiaries you select. This is an excellent way to transfer property to family members at a minimal cost.

You fund this type of trust with cash or appreciated assets—and receive an immediate federal income tax charitable deduction. You can also make additional gifts; each one also qualifies for a tax deduction. The trust pays you, each year, a variable amount based on a fixed percentage of the fair market value of the trust assets. When the trust terminates, the remaining principal goes to Pacific as a lump sum.

You fund this trust with cash or appreciated assets—and receive an immediate federal income tax charitable deduction. Each year the trust pays you or another named individual the same dollar amount you choose at the start. When the trust terminates, the remaining principal goes to Pacific as a lump sum.

A beneficiary designation clearly identifies how specific assets will be distributed after your death.

A charitable gift annuity involves a simple contract between you and Pacific where you agree to make a gift to Pacific and we, in return, agree to pay you (and someone else, if you choose) a fixed amount each year for the rest of your life.

Closely Held Stock

If you want to remain in control of your closely held stock during your lifetime, consider a gift in your will or living trust.

More about Closely Held Stock
Real Estate

To avoid the administrative hassles of selling real estate during your lifetime, give it to us through a bequest.

More about Real Estate
Cash

A gift of cash is one of the most popular ways to support us after your lifetime. You may gift a specified sum of money or a percentage of your estate.

More about Cash
Appreciated Securities

A gift in your will or trust of securities often allows you to make larger gifts than you could during your lifetime.

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Tangible Personal Property

Leave your legacy with a gift of antiques, stamp/coin collections or works of art.

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Bank Accounts, Certificates of Deposit or Brokerage Accounts

You can name University of the Pacific as beneficiary of your bank accounts, CDs and brokerage accounts by designating your account as Payable on Death (POD) or Transfer on Death (TOD) to us.

More about Bank Accounts, Certificates of Deposit or Brokerage Accounts
Commercial Annuities

A portion of the distributions from commercial annuities is subject to income tax for non-charitable beneficiaries. Naming Pacific as a beneficiary of all or a portion of your commercial annuity will allow us to receive the assets you designate to us completely tax-free.

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Retirement Plan Assets

The full value of your IRA, 401(k), 403(b) or other qualified plans is subject to federal and state estate taxes at your death and the distributions from these accounts are subject to federal and applicable state income taxes. Instead, consider naming Pacific as a beneficiary of all or a portion of your plan.

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Life Insurance

By naming Pacific as a beneficiary of all or a portion of your life insurance policy, you support our work while retaining the ability to change your gift if your plans change.

More about Life Insurance

Please provide the following information to view the materials for planning your estate.